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apparently unfounded. nasa is using radar and other technology to study how the asteroid behaves, including its rotation rate, its composition and how it's impacted by the earth's gravity. the idea is to learn enough to prevent cat as it sfroe fee from it threatening in the future. >> we're going to get a lot of information about the asteroid. we're interested in its future motion, whether or not it could come back, whether it threatens the earth. >> reporter: the odds are either this one or another will be back. an asteroid impact the earth about every 120 years on average. it will be visible in the rthernemisphere this evening if you have access to a telescope. for now it's on its way away from the earth out into outer space harmlessly rotating -- or resolving -- excuse me. harmlessly rotating -- i can't even think of the right word. orbiting the sun. harmlessly at least for now, jim. >> casey, thanks very much. we appreciate it. ? or gal lat particular news, a meteor lit up the skies over eastern russia. the blinding light was followed by a series of deafening explosions. listen to this.
to nasa's jet propulsion laboratory, where they're keeping a close eye on what's going on. >> wolf, we're inside the deep space network operation center at the jet propulsion laboratory at nasa's facility in pasadena, california. it's at the jet propulsion lab, where nasa will be monitoring that asteroid. it's called 2012 da-14, because it was discovered last year. that's an artist rendering of it, but they're going to be looking at the real thing when it passes very close to earth on friday, mid-day. it's going to pass within about 17,200 miles of earth. that's a lot closer than the moon is to the earth. it's also within the satellite ring. about 5,000 miles within the ring of satellites that hover above the earth's surface. what can we really expect from that asteroid has it passes close to earth? i'm here with paul, a research astronomer with nasa's near-earth object program. paul, let's get this out of the way. does this threaten earth? is it going to impact earth? >> no, we've been tracking this closely for a year and we know it will not hit the earth. >> what about the satellites
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)